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NOTICE TO APPEAR AND CRIMINAL OFFENCES

Updated: Dec 1, 2022

If you have been given a Notice to Appear from a police officer in Queensland following an alleged criminal offence, the next steps you take are crucial.


What is a Notice to Appear?

A Notice to Appear is one of three options a Police Officer has when initiating criminal proceedings against an individual in Queensland. The other two are (1) arrest and charge and (2) complaint and summons. (Police Powers and Responsibilities Act 1997 (QLD))


A Notice to Appear (NTA) is an official document that legally requires you to attend court on a certain date.

A NTA will also include information such as:

  • what criminal offences you have been charged with;

  • the time, place, and date of the offence;

  • what court you are to attend; and

  • brief information about the alleged offence.

A NTA can be issued for an array of minor or large criminal offences. It may be issued ‘on the spot’ as an alternative to arrest or issued after someone has been taken into custody as an alternative to charging and bailing the person. (Criminal Justice Commission)


Failing to Appear


If you fail to attend court on the date as listed in your NTA, you could have a warrant issued for your arrest or further charges laid.


Notifying Work About Your Notice to Appear


You may wonder, “Do I need to tell my employer about my NTA?”.


You may be required to follow guidelines regarding notifying your employer or professional body about your Notice to Appear. This will depend on the type of employment you are currently under.


It is important to obtain legal advice as soon as possible to clear up any concerns you may have regarding this matter.


What do you do if you have received a Notice to Appear?


If you have been given a Notice to Appear from a police officer in Queensland following an alleged criminal offence, the next steps you take are crucial.


Begin to seek legal assistance as soon as you can. Doing so will minimise room for error or misrepresentation through inadequate legal support.


If you are considering representing yourself in court, it may be wise to re-evaluate. No one is ever ready to face the courts on their own. Read more about self-representation in court: https://www.creeveyrussell.com.au/post/an-inside-look-self-representation-in-court


1800 CRIME LAW, Creevey Horrell Lawyers, Roma, Toowoomba, Brisbane and Townsville Queensland


If you have received a notice to appear for a criminal offence, you will need to seek professional and proven support from a Criminal Lawyer.


With more than 50 years of combined experience in criminal law matters, we have a proven track record of achieving outstanding results for our clients.


Let us help you. Contact us today to find out more.



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